Resilience does not explain the dissociation between chronic pain and physical activity in South Africans living with HIV

Resilience does not explain the dissociation between chronic pain and physical activity in South Africans living with HIV

It seems self-evident, especially to the patients themselves (Riley, Ahern & Follick, 1988), that chronic pain, especially if it is moderate to severe, will interfere with activities of daily living. Pain is experienced by 50–75% (depending on cohort) of people living with HIV (PLWH), and for most of them the pain is moderate to severe in intensity (Parker, Stein & Jelsma, 2014). As expected, PLWH in the US and Denmark reported significant pain-related functional impairment (Breitbart et al., 1996; Frich & Borgbjerg, 2000; Merlin et al., 2013), yet African PLWH with similar levels of pain reported little or no functional interference (Mphahlele, Mitchell & Kamerman, 2012; Voss et al., 2007; Wahab & Salami, 2011). Moderate to severe pain limits function in other populations including those with rheumatoid arthritis and dysmenorrhea (Chantler, Mitchell & Fuller, 2009; Prioreschi et al., 2013).

 

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