Resilience does not explain the dissociation between chronic pain and physical activity in South Africans living with HIV

chris@csa.co.za
By chris@csa.co.za March 13, 2017 08:13

Resilience does not explain the dissociation between chronic pain and physical activity in South Africans living with HIV

It seems self-evident, especially to the patients themselves (Riley, Ahern & Follick, 1988), that chronic pain, especially if it is moderate to severe, will interfere with activities of daily living. Pain is experienced by 50–75% (depending on cohort) of people living with HIV (PLWH), and for most of them the pain is moderate to severe in intensity (Parker, Stein & Jelsma, 2014). As expected, PLWH in the US and Denmark reported significant pain-related functional impairment (Breitbart et al., 1996; Frich & Borgbjerg, 2000; Merlin et al., 2013), yet African PLWH with similar levels of pain reported little or no functional interference (Mphahlele, Mitchell & Kamerman, 2012; Voss et al., 2007; Wahab & Salami, 2011). Moderate to severe pain limits function in other populations including those with rheumatoid arthritis and dysmenorrhea (Chantler, Mitchell & Fuller, 2009; Prioreschi et al., 2013).

 

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chris@csa.co.za
By chris@csa.co.za March 13, 2017 08:13

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