Neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury: the impact of sensorimotor activity

Neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury: the impact of sensorimotor activity

Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in severe sensory, motor, and autonomic dysfunction frequently followed by spasticity and neuropathic pain (NP).

Neuropathic pain can arise as a direct result of the damaged peripheral or central somatosensory nervous system. A prospective study applying the new Spinal Cord Injury Pain Classification11 reported pain in 80% of patients with traumatic SCI.38 Approximately, 40% to 60% of all SCI patients develop NP at or below the level of injury2,12,38,81,91 and half of them report pain levels as moderate to severe.38,81 Neuropathic pain that emerges within the first year after SCI2,37,38 tends to become chronic37,81 and is characterized by sensory deficits, spontaneous, or stimulus-evoked pain, including allodynia and hyperalgesia and may be associated with dysaesthesia and paresthesia.11,35 Neuropathic pain influences life beyond pain sensation impairing rehabilitation and quality of life.1,71,

 

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