anticonvulsants in the treatment of low back pain and lumbar radicular pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis

anticonvulsants in the treatment of low back pain and lumbar radicular pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Millions of people have low back pain, which causes more disability than any other health condition.1 Most people with low back pain have symptoms resulting from nonspecific causes. About 5% to 10% of people with low back pain have sciatica, in which the leg pain follows the sciatic nerve and can be accompanied by strength, sensory and reflex changes in the leg. A smaller proportion of people have neurogenic claudication, in which the leg pain is associated with spinal stenosis and symptoms are exacerbated with extension activities (e.g., walking) and relieved by flexion (e.g., sitting). Leg pain originating from the lumbar spine is commonly referred to as radicular pain.

 

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