South African Guideline for the Use of Chronic Opioid Therapy for Chronic Non-cancer Pain

South African Guideline for the Use of Chronic Opioid Therapy for Chronic Non-cancer Pain

M Raff, 1 BSc, MB ChB, FCA (SA); J Crosier, 1 MB ChB, ChM, FRCS, FCS (SA); S Eppel, 1 MB ChB, FRCS (Edin), ABU (USA); H Meyer, 2 MB ChB, MPraxMed, MFGP (SA), FCFP (SA); B Sarembock, 1,3 MB ChB, FCP (SA), RHEUM (SA); D Webb, 4 BSc (Hons), MB ChB

 

1. Introduction Chronic pain is common, affecting around one in five patients in primary care. It may occur even more frequently in older individuals, whose presentation is often complicated by age-related physiological changes, comorbidities and multiple medications. Chronic pain patients are more likely to report anxiety or depression and significant activity limitations and often have unfavourable perceptions of their health.[1] Chronic pain may have a significant impact on healthrelated quality of life and may be difficult to manage. Opioids are well accepted for the treatment of severe acute pain and chronic pain associated with cancer and at the end of life. Although there are short-term studies demonstrating efficacy in chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP), less is known about their efficacy and safety with long-term use. The potential for addiction, tolerance and dependence associated with this class of analgesics also remains a concern

 

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